Dutch Courses Ľ Advanced Course Ľ Parts of Speech Ľ Adjectives

Adjectives

An adjective tells something about a noun. In this example, the noun is boek. We use the adjective groen (green) to mention the color of a book. When de or het proceeds the noun, one letter must be added to the adjective. This letter (a suffix) is e. It is added to groen to make groene.

het groene boek - the green book
de groene tafel - the green table

When a noun is preceded by een, there are two possibilities. If het can be placed before a certain noun, we donít add e to the adjective. In this example the adjective is groen, because it precedes a het-noun.

een groen boek - a green book

If de can be placed before the noun, we add e to the adjective. In this example the adjective is groene, because it precedes a de-noun.

een groene tafel - a green table

When the noun is plural, we always add e to the adjective.

groene boeken - green books
groene tafels - green tables
de groene boeken - the green books
de groene tafels - the green tables

Sometimes a word must loose a letter when the pronunciation is not affected by it. This happens to groot. When the e suffix is added, oo must be shorted to o. The word grote is the result. Compare groot with groen, which cannot be ďabbreviatedĒ.

het grote schip - the big ship
de grote auto - the big car
een groot schip - a big ship
een grote auto - a big car
de grote schepen - the big ships
de grote autoís - the big cars

Letís translate ďa blue bikeĒ into Dutch.

  • a is found in the dictionary: een.
  • blue is found in the dictionary: blauw.
  • bike is found in the dictionary: de fiets.
  • We just read how to deal with an adjective, when it is preceded by een. In this case (fiets is a de-noun), we add an e to blauw. We get: blauwe.
  • Result: een blauwe fiets

    Letís translate ďa big carĒ into Dutch.

  • a is found in the dictionary: een.
  • big is found in the dictionary: groot.
  • car is found in the dictionary: de auto.
  • We read how to deal with an adjective, when it is preceded by een. In this case (auto is a de-noun), we add an e to groot.
  • Because the pronunciation will not be affected by it, we must drop one o and get: grote.
  • Result: een grote auto

    There are three other rules for adaptations to the spelling of adjectives. The four spelling rules apply also to plural nouns and verbs.

    If an adjective ends with s , then change this letter to z when you add e to the word.
    Een grijs dak. Het grijze dak. - A grey roof. The grey roof.
    Een ambitieus plan. Het ambitieuze plan. - An ambitious plan. The ambitious plan.

    If an adjective ends with f , then change this letter to v when you add e to the word.
    Een creatief plan. Het creatieve plan. - A creative plan. The creative plan.

    If an adjective has one of the following vowels: a, e, i, o, u, then the consonant (following the vowel) has to be doubled, when the pronunciation of the vowel would change (which is not correct) because of the adding of an e. When you add e, then the vowel is suddenly part of an open syllable. In that case the vowel would be pronounced as one of the Dutch sounds aa, ee, ie, oo, or uu, but that is not correct. So we add a vowel to close the syllable.
    Een zwak paard. Het zwakke paard. - A weak horse. The weak horse.
    Een bot mes. Het botte mes. A dull knife. The dull knife.

    Two of these rules are causing spelling adaptations to the word draadloos.
    Een draadloos apparaat. Het draadloze apparaat. - A wireless device. The wireless device.

    Materials

    When talking about materials, like iron, paper or wood, the suffix we add to the adjective is often en.

    de ijzeren tafel - the iron table
    de ijzeren tafels - the iron tables
    het ijzeren dak - the iron roof
    de stenen muren - the brick walls
    de houten tafel - the wooden table
    het papieren servet - the paper napkin
    de wollen handschoenen - the woolen gloves

    Some adjectives in this category have no suffix.
    de plastic buis - the plastic tube
    het nylon touw - the nylon rope

    How to leave out the noun

    When you leave out the noun that is the subject, the adjective suddenly becomes the subject of the sentence. The reader must derive from the context what you actually mean. The first sentence shows the noun. In the second sentence the noun is left out.
    De groene tafel is schoongemaakt. - The green table has been cleaned.
    De groene is schoongemaakt. - The green one has been cleaned.

    Sometimes it is beyond question what you mean, even if you leave out a noun.
    De groene boeken en de blauwe boeken zijn kwijt. - The green books and the blue books are lost.
    De groene en de blauwe boeken zijn kwijt. - The green and the blue books are lost.

    In the next example, notice the extra e in groene. The adjective always gets an e-suffix when it acts like a noun.
    Hij kreeg een blauw boek en ik een groen boek. - He got a blue book and I a green book.
    Hij kreeg een blauw boek en ik een groene. - He got a blue book and I a green one.

    Many adjectives can act like a noun.
    de blauwe - The blue one
    de rode - The red one
    een snelle - a fast one

    Dutch words used as adjectives and adverbs

    In Dutch, some words are used as adjectives and adverbs as well. It is an adjective when you say:
    Een snel schip. - A quick ship.

    It is an adverb when you say:
    Het schip roest snel. - The ship rusts quickly.
    Itís the rusting that is quickly. Quickly says something about the verb to rust.

    When the verb is zijn (to be), the adverb says something about the verb to be, and therefore about the subject being something.
    Het boek is groen. - The book is green.

    It does not matter if the noun is preceded by de or het, the spelling is the same. We get:
    Het boek is groen. - The book is green.
    De tafel is groen. - The table is green.

    When the noun is preceded by een, we get:
    Een boek is groen als de kaft groen is. - A book is green, when the cover is green.
    Een boek is rood als de kaft rood is. - A book is red, when the cover is red.
    Een tafel is blauw als het blad blauw is. - A table is blue, when the top is blue.

    When the noun is plural, we get:
    De boeken zijn groen. - The books are green.
    De tafels zijn groen. - The tables are green.
    Weilanden zijn groen. - Pastures are green.

    Degrees of comparison

    We can use degrees of comparison to compare things. We can say which ship is big, bigger, or the biggest. In Dutch we say groot, groter, and grootst. The word groter has lost an o, because the pronunciation is not affected by losing it. For het-nouns we get:
    Het schip is groot. - The ship is big.
    Het schip is groter dan mijn straat. - The ship is bigger than my street.
    Dat schip is het grootst. - That ship is the biggest.

    The same works for de-nouns.
    De auto is groot. - The car is big.
    De auto is groter dan mijn tuin. - The car is bigger than my garden.
    Die auto is het grootst. - That car is the biggest.

    In the next examples we use the adjective before the noun, as a real adjective. We get for het-nouns:
    het grote schip - the big ship
    het grotere schip - the bigger ship
    het grootste schip - the biggest ship

    And for de-nouns:
    de grote auto - the big car
    de grotere auto - the bigger car
    de grootste auto - the biggest car

    When een appears, groot or groter is used for het-nouns.
    een groot schip - a big ship
    een groter schip - a bigger ship

    When een appears, grote or grotere is used for de-nouns.
    een grote auto - a big car
    een grotere auto - a bigger car

    Letís translate ďa bigger carĒ into Dutch.

  • a is found in the dictionary: een.
  • big is found in the dictionary: groot.
  • car is found in the dictionary: de auto.
  • We add er to groot, because we need bigger and not big.
  • We get a word that does not exist in Dutch: grooter.
  • Because the pronunciation will not be affected by dropping one o, we must do so. We get: groter.
  • In the first paragraph of this chapter we read how to deal with an adjective, when it is preceded by een. In this case (auto is a de-noun), we add an e to it: grotere.
  • Result: een grotere auto

    Letís translate ďa more beautiful shipĒ.

  • a is found in the dictionary: een.
  • beautiful is found in the dictionary: mooi.
  • ship is found in the dictionary: het schip.
  • We add er to mooi, because we need more beautiful. So we get: mooier.
  • We cannot to drop any letters of the sound ooi, because that would change the pronunciation.
  • In the first paragraph of this chapter we read how to deal with an adjective, when it is preceded by een. In this case (schip is a het-noun), we donít add an e to it.
  • Result: een mooier schip

    Examples:
    Dat is een grote vrachtwagen. - Thatís a big truck.
    Dat is een heel grote auto. - Thatís a very big car.
    Je hebt een grotere tuin nodig. - You need a bigger garden.
    Je hebt een groter kantoor nodig. - You need a bigger office.
    Dat is de grootste auto die hier kan parkeren. - That is the biggest car that can park here.

    Using the Present Participle as an Adjective

    To make the present participle of a verb, take the infinitive (the word you will find in the dictionary when you search for a verb) and add d to it. The infinitive of the verb roesten (to rust) plus d is roestend. You can use it as an adjective this way:
    Dat is een snel roestend schip. - That is a quickly rusting ship.
    Dat is het roestende schip. - That is the rusting ship.

    An adjective made from a present participle often gets an extra e, just like normal adjectives. From the verb smelten (to melt) we derive the present participle smeltend (melting). The adjective smeltend is used just like groen, as you can see below.
    het smeltende ijsje - the melting ice cream
    het groene ijsje - the green ice cream
    een smeltend ijsje - a melting ice cream
    een groen ijsje - a green ice cream
    de smeltende ijsberg - the melting iceberg
    de groene ijsberg - the green iceberg
    een smeltende ijsberg - a melting iceberg
    een groene ijsberg - a green iceberg

    Other examples:
    de schaatsende vrouwen - the skating women
    het winnende team - the winning team
    een hinnikend paard - a neighing horse

    Using the Past Participle as an Adjective

    A past participle of a verb is strong or weak. When a past participle is weak, it normally starts with ge and ends with d or t. An adjective made from a past participle often gets an extra e, just like normal adjectives. The past participle of gooien (to throw) is gegooid (thrown). The past participle of gebruiken (to use) is gebruikt (used). An e is added when needed.
    de gegooide bal - the thrown ball
    de gebruikte mixer - the used mixer
    een gebruikt bord - a used plate
    het gebruikte bord - the used plate

    When a past participle is strong, it normally starts with ge and ends with en. Donít add any extra letters when making an adjective from a strong past participle. Note: Adjectives denoting materials donít get an extra e either.
    het gezongen lied - the song that was sung
    de verloren sleutel - the lost key
    de verloren, ijzeren sleutel - the lost iron key

    The past participle geweest (been) of the verb zijn (to be) cannot be used as an adjective. It has to be adapted to gewezen.
    de gewezen burgemeester - the former burgomaster

    back to top